Pineapple Gojju

A motley group of thoughts implore me to reminisce home. It’s not the squish of summery peaches or the engulfing aroma of warm cookies when I walk into a mall although they’re just as pleasing. It’s more the rhythmic clunk of a ladle and an iron pan when amma roasts groundnuts and jaggery to appease my dad’s sweet tooth,  the voice of Subbalakshmi spinning through a languid morning, possibly even the faint whirr of vehicles outside our window but mostly, delicious thoughts of a meal feasted on a gigantic banana leaf.


South Indian gatherings have a flair for conjuring a loud rumpus and I mean this in a good way. Palpable excitement, colour and good food served on a plate shaped by Mother Nature herself .This oblong and dramatically designed leaf is generously laden with traditional and authentic dishes like Payasa(kheer), a sundry of Palyas(dry curries), Pickles. Chutneys, Dal(lentils), Sambar(spicy lentil stew), Rasam fragrant with ghee,Gojjus & more. The flavours emanating from the leaf dance delicately with those from the food and elevate a mere lunch to an experience fit for the Gods. Among the plethora of foods that land on the leaf, the one I yearn for the most is the Pineapple Gojju.


A gojju is essentially a savory side dish with a delicious intermingling of sweet, spicy and tangy. Sometimes cooked to create a stew-like dish but many times(like this one), it is  not.  These uncooked gojjus are referred to as Hasi Rasas(raw gojju) in Kannada because the mixture is not simmered. Lemons, raisins, raw mango etc be used to make this gojju but pineapples always have been a personal favourite.


The tang and sweet essences from pineapples mingle with the spices to create a sensational experience which when mopped up with cold curd-rice transpires into bliss. Or if you prefer, gently mix it with some hot rice and a tiny bit of oil to drive away those dreaded Monday afternoon blues. Pairs well with chapatis too. In fact this dish tastes better the following day owing to the pineapples marinating in it, making it a little sweeter and a whole lot more divine.
Hope you like this one!

RECIPE FOR PINEAPPLE GOJJU
INGREDIENTS
1/2 tsp oil
1/2 tbsp Urad dal
1/2 tbsp chana dal
1 tbsp Dhaniya/coriander seeds
1 tsp Menthe/Fenugreek seeds
13 dried Kashmiri Chillies
2 dried Guntoor Chillies(see notes)
A pinch of Hing/Asafoetida
3/4 cup dry coconut slices/VaNakobri
1/2 tbsp scant, thick tamarind paste(I used store-bought)
1/4 cup grated Jaggery
Salt to taste
1 cup Pineapple- chopped and cubed into 1 cm pieces
1 + scant 1/4 cup water
For tempering-
1 tbsp oil
A small handful of fresh curry leaves
1 tsp  mustard seeds

METHOD
-In a kadai/wok, heat 1/2 tsp oil. To this , add Urad Dal, Chana Dal, Menthe/Fenugreek,  seeds, Coriander seeds, Hing and both chillies. Fry on medium-low flame until the lentils are a nice, deep golden. Transfer the contents to a plate and let cool
-In the same kadai, without adding any oil, roast the dry coconut slices in a medium-low flame, stirring constantly until they turn a light brown. Transfer to a plate and let cool.
-In a mixie jar/food processor, minimally grind the dal/lentil mixture, it should be half ground. Add the cooled coconut slices and grind completely until a coarse blend is achieved. Now add the salt, jaggery, tamarind paste and water so that a slightly loose but coarse paste is formed. Taste to check if any extra salt, tamarind, chillies or jaggery is necessary
-Pour the mixture into a bowl and fold in the pineapples.
-To make the tempering, in a small kadai/tadka pan, heat oil. Add mustard seeds and allow them to splutter. Turn off heat and then add the curry leaves. once they crisp up, add this tempering to the gojju.
-Can be served immediately but even better if you let the pineapple marinate in the gojju for an hour or two, then serve.

Notes:

-I used store bought concentrated tamarind paste which is rather strong. If you’re using dried tamarind and making the tamarind pulp from that, you will need to use more than the amount specified above.
-Guntoor chillies can be quite spicy. If you want a less spicy gojju, just skip them.
-The gojju tastes better the following day(refrigerated) owing to the marinating pineapples, making it a little more sweet. I do not recommend using it beyond a day or 2.

Summer Romance: Mango Curd Tart

Meals are always sweeter in the summer. Oui?  Many summers ago, my uncle would bring crates of farm-grown unripened Raspuri mangoes ensuing my room being transformed into a safe-place for their ripening. Days later, the mangoes metamorphosed into soft fruits, fit to perk up lazy holidays. Amma(my mother) gathered more than a few every evening to conjure up ShreekarNe, a golden puree of mangoes with a touch of milk, a smattering of cardamom and a sprinkle of saffron. Pooris or rotis were mandatorily involved. Flaky, ghee laden rotis or puffed pooris were torn into, then dunked unhingedly into a bowl of ShreekarNe and just like that, a  simple dinner experience turned a tad sweeter, a tad celebratory. Like I said, meals are always sweeter in the summer.

In my books, a ShreekarNe remains to be the very best way to devour mangoes. Of course, carelessly chomping on them thereby concocting a sticky, happy mess qualifies as sane too. There’s something to be said about devouring them with no abandon; their sweet syrup trickling down; their juicy pulp satiating sweet desires on a dull, lazy, sunshine deluged afternoon. It culminates in a summer romance like no other.
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That said, I’m also on a perpetual quest to bake with them whilst not losing their soul to excessive sugar; to capture that essence and ineffable joy and pour it all into a decadent cake or a cheesecake or perhaps a luscious, chilled kulfi speckled with saffron threads . Toronto lacks Bangalore’s pulpy Raspuri mangoes but answers with plumper and just as juicy Altaufo mangoes. Fortunately, they are stacked up tall in the China Market and needless to say, the shop is religiously paid a visit over weekends.
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A couple of summers ago, driven by a spot of enthusiasm and adventure, I made a rich mango custard and piped them into elaichi cupcakes resulting in a gooey goodness with every bite. Earlier this year, when the mangoes first started to make an appearance, I entwined their flavour with a touch of vanilla into a simple Bundt cake, then doused it with a sweet mango syrup. Today, I present to you a silky, sweet Mango Curd Tart.
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This Mango Curd Tart screams of mangoes but additionally screams of summer too. A graham cracker crust cradles a smooth and rich vegan mango puree, which after refrigeration transpires into a cold, velvety dessert with the most delicate crunch. It comes together very quickly and is a no-bake as well. Admittedly, I was tempted to infuse it with other flavors; perhaps some basil or a sprinkle of cardamom but I restrained myself in order for the mangoes to dominate the dessert. The colors of this dessert are akin to those of sunshine and it satiates the most delicious summer dreams. Hope you like it as much as we did:)

RECIPE FOR NO BAKE MANGO CURD TART
Makes 1 9 inch Tart

INGREDIENTS
For the Crust
220 grams of Graham Crackers
110 grams of melted butter

For the Filling
1.5 cups Mango Puree( To make this, I took the pulp from 2 mangoes, blended it until smooth and then strained it into a medium saucepan)
1/2 cup water
7 tbsp Corn Starch
1 cup almond milk
1 cup granulated sugar

Others
Fresh fruits to decorate

Method
For the Graham Cracker Crust
-In a food processor, powder the graham crackers till they are fine. Mix them with the melted butter until you achieve a wet sand like consistency.
-Transfer this to the greased tart pan and press on the base and the sides with the help of a flat bottomed cup, to ensure that the crust is uniformly layered on the pan.
-Chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

For the Vegan Mango Curd
-In a large saucepan or pot, add the mango puree(see ingredients) and water. Mix and place on medium heat. Let it simmer and reduce for a few minutes(3-4 minutes).
-While it is simmering, in a bowl, mix together the almond milk and cornstarch making sure there are no lumps.
-To the simmering mango puree,  add the sugar and stir. Let the sugar dissolve completely.
Once the sugar has dissolved completely, add the almond milk-cornstarch mixture and whisk continuously with a wooden spoon or a silicone spatula. It is important to whisk continuously because otherwise there will be lumps. Do this for 4-5 minutes or until the mango curd thickens. Immediately take it away from the heat and transfer to the chilled graham cracker crust. Smooth top if necessary and chill overnight.
It is ready to be sliced and enjoyed the next morning.