Sourdough Cinnamon Rolls with Matcha Frosting

Imagine a morning when sweet, intoxicating wafts of cinnamon pervade your home, perhaps a pot of coffee brewing on the side, an instrumental rendition of La vie en rose gliding through the air and a flood of sunshine complete with floating specks of fairy dust. The magic I share with you today may not guarantee the full picture I’ve painted but promises to fulfill at least a portion of it, one that is most delicious. These are Sourdough Cinnamon Buns slathered with an earthy Matcha Cream Cheese Frosting. Before we head to the recipe, allow me share a little backstory.
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Little did I know that yeast, water, flour and salt can conjure magic; harmonize to create beautiful joys together. Bread and all its fluffier and denser cousins have been making their presence in my hardworking oven for a while now.The journey began a year and a half ago and the entailed learning has me bewitched in its charm. Baking bread lets me satiate the mad desire to bake; it tells me to revere & revel in the little things: watch that dough majestically rise, inhale evanescent aromas and listen in silence as the knife through a crackling crust; it indulges the insomniac in me and well, it brings the husband many smiles. More importantly, it slows me down.
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In the midst of this delicious journey, I stumbled upon a whole other dimension of bread that had forever piqued my curiosity: Sourdough. After umpteen patient trials, tear jerking failures and finally squeal worthy successes, I can safely say that nothing has challenged and enamored me more than the process of baking and finally slicing into a boule of sourdough bread.

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The ‘mother’ aka the sourdough starter

I’m only gracing the surface here but in technical terms sourdough bread is essentially bread that arises from naturally occurring yeast and bacteria as opposed to ones where we employ commercially occurring yeast products. While the latter works just fine, the benefits of sourdough are plenty including several that are health related since increased proofing times lead to better digestion of grains. The taste takes on a variation too and these breads possess a slight sour taste which again depends from starter to starter. However, the main ingredient this bread calls for is patience since the ‘mother’ aka the sourdough starter takes a couple of weeks to come to life and the bread itself takes anywhere between 12-24 hours to conjure. But, mind you, once she does(the starter),she won’t leave you unless you want her to. If you want to explore my journey in sourdough and other breads alike, please to stop by my page on Instagram, La Vie Of A Baker . I hope you will enjoy exploring through crumbs and crusts.
A fun side note, I have named my sourdough starter, Khaleesi and yes, it is inspired y Game of Thrones!
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Before I go any further, I have to mention that this recipe requires one to have a 100% hydration sourdough starter. (I hope to share the recipe for that too sometime in the near future). I would also like to recommend certain books that only helped introduce me to sourdough but also gave me an experience very similar to a private class. Sarah Owen’s ‘Sourdough’ is one such. The other one is Emilie Raffa’s, ‘Artisan Sourdough Made Simple’. Both these books assist in creating the Sourdough Starter and breads employing the starter.
Now, the recipe. Like I mentioned earlier, these buns will ensure a beautiful morning owing to the presence of cinnamon in the filling. The bread itself is soft and fluffy, perfect to tear away whilst indulging in pinched sips of coffee or tea. To jazz them up further, I paired them with a decadent Matcha Cream Cheese Frosting. The aromatic, sweet flavours of Matcha take these humble breakfast quintessentials to a whole new level but the frosting’s creamy nature shouldn’t be ignored either. Hope you like this one!

RECIPE FOR EGGFREE SOURDOUGH CINNAMON BUNS WITH A MATCHA FROSTING
Please note: This recipe requires 100% hydration sourdough starter

Makes 9 cinnamon rolls
Equipment needed- Food Scale
Stand Mixer
INGREDIENTS
For the Dough
100 gms active Sourdough Starter
160 gms Whole Milk
42 gms unsalted butter
1 tsp egg replacer plus 2tbsp water( I used Pane Riso, please see notes)
24 gms Sugar
300 gms Unbleached All purpose flour
3 gms sea salt
Oil for coating
For the Filling
1 cup light brown sugar
1.5 tbsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
4 tbsp butter, softened at room temperature

METHOD
-First we prepare the sweet dough and this is best to make at night since it can rise overnight and be ready in the morning.
-Warm the milk and butter in a pan until butter has completely melted. Cool slightly.
-In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachement, add the sourdough starter along with the egg replacer and water. Whisk at low speed to ensure that it is mixed. Add the warm milk and butter mixture. Then add the flour and salt and mix just until the dough comes together and no dry bits are lift, approximately 1 minute.Cover the bowl with a damp towel and let it rest for 30 minutes.
-After the dough has rested, change to a hook attachment and continue to knead at medium speed for about 6 to 8 minutes until the dough is soft and smooth and pulls away from the sides of the bowl.
-Take another bowl, and grease it with a little olive oil and place the dough in it. Let it rise at room temperature for 8-10 hours.(the recommended room temperature is around 70F).
-Next morning, once it has doubled in size, carefully tip the dough onto a lightly oiled counter and let it rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile prepare the filling.
-In a bowl, mix together light brown sugar, cinnamon and salt and keep aside.
-On a large cookie sheet with edges, place a sheet of parchment.
-After the dough has rested, using a rolling pin, stretch the dough to a rectangle measuring 22inches x 16inches, taking care that the longer side is facing you.
-Spread the 4 tbsp of butter on the rectangle using an offset spatula ensuring that the about 1 inch of the border are not touched. Sprinkle the filling and spread evenly
-Next roll the rectangle into a cylinder, slowly and gently, making sure that it is taut. The tighter you roll, the more layers you’ll have.
-Place this log gently on the cookie sheet, cover with a damp cloth and refrigerate for 30 minutes.(If the weather gets a little warm, I also cover the cookie sheet completely in plastic wrap and freeze additionally for 5-7 minutes).
-Remove the chilled dough and cut off the edges .Then cut into 2 inch cylinders.
-Place these in a 3×3 fashion on the same cookie sheet and cover lightly with plastic wrap for 1-1.5 hours until the rolls are puffy.(Alternatively, they can be baked in a square or round cake pan).
-Meanwhile preheat your oven to 425F. Brush the rolls with some melted butter
and bake the cinnamon rolls for 25-30 minutes or until they turn a light golden brown.
-When they are getting baked, the frosting can be made. In a bowl, add the cream cheese and butter and beat with a hand mixer until fluffy. Add the icing sugar and incorporate it into the butter and cream cheese by whisking it for a few minutes. Then add the sour cream and matcha and mix again. Cover and refrigerate until use.
-Spread the matcha cream cheese frosting on the warm cinnamon rolls and enjoy!

Notes:
The egg replacer that I used(Pane Riso) demands 1tsp of it plus 2 tbsp of water. But, this can vary from brand to brand. Please see the directions on the product that you choose to use.

Spring laden Pasta in a Basil Pesto

Many of our Saturday mornings, winter or warmer, have adopted a little ritual. A sanctimonious one, demanding equal parts worship and sacrifice. The sacrifice involves rejecting the few extra precious hours of weekend sleep and beginning the morning a tad earlier than usual. The worship comprises a prayer to the Transit Gods of Toronto, hoping for a bus that arrives on schedule. And finally, the ritual in question implies a rejuvenating escape to the St.Lawrence Farmer’s Market.
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Thriving amid fresh,seasonal produce, strolling along the aisles encompassed by the profusion of vegetables and fruits, their vibrant skins dappled with shimmering droplets of water, is admittedly my kind of meditation, my panacea, my prayer. St. Lawrence Market offers just that and appeases my soul whilst simultaneously exciting and enthralling my creative side of the brain.
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The saturday market is huddled within a white tent and the vendors entice customers who are still warding off the sleep bug with, little cups of apple cider,swigs of fermented yogurt, fresh cut apple slices, trimmings of cheese and spoonfuls of olive tapenade. If that doesn’t entail enough enlivening, then rows of neatly lined herbs in a deep, verdant green, stacks of colour coded bell peppers, mountains of earthy potatoes, minuscule baskets heaped with tomatoes in a variety of sizes, each one more darling than the other, buckets plopped with lovely, seasonal flowers, these definitely do the trick.

Sticklers to our timetable, we headed there one spring morning. As suspected, the market was alive with its usual hustle-bustle, brimming with the bounty of spring. Tall stems of tulips, towering pyramids of asparagus, bunches of seasonal ramp, bouquets of rhubarb; it was verily a festival, one that pleased the soul, the eyes and the belly.
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As you can imagine, there is no dearth of inspiration here and we hauled back fresh basil, bunches of ramp, asparagus stalks, cherry tomatoes and a carton of pasta. I decided to pour this bounty into a dish, a new adventure considering I had never tasted ramp and asparagus, both harbingers of spring.
The culmination of that inspiration is what you see here: A Strozzapreti pasta slathered unrestrainedly with a Basil-Walnut Pesto mingling with peas and ramp leaves and a side of asparagus and cherry tomatoes. This is my  tribute to the languid breeze of spring, my gratitude to Mother Nature’s fresh bounty.
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Before we head to the recipe, a little more about the ingredients-
Ramp is essentially a wild onion, rather pungent and taste like a mixture of  onion and garlic. I employed all the leaves but only used a few of the bulbs in this pasta since their aroma was a little too strong for us.
Asparagus spears are described to have earthy undertones and they can be grilled, boiled or fried. Here, I’ve just stir fried them with some oil and salt.
Common to the Emilia-Romagna, Umbria, Marche, and Tuscany regions of Italy, the Strozzapreti is a hand-rolled pasta that is similar to cavatelli but it is slightly more elongated, and features a light twist. A little Italian store in the heart of St. Lawrence Market has a wall dedicated to pastas in all shapes and sizes. The owner always treats to a few drops of aged balsamic vinegar before fixing up our usual cup of joe. Bellissimo!

RECIPE FOR PASTA IN A BASIL PESTO AND SPRING VEGETABLES
Serves 4

INGREDIENTS
250 gms Strozzapreti pasta or any other kind
2.5 litres water
2 tbsp of salt
For the Basil Walnut Pesto:-
2 cups loose basil
12 walnuts
1/3 cup oil 
Freshly cracked pepper and salt to taste
Other vegetables:
2 bunches ramp- 25 leaves
1/2 cup frozen peas
1 cup heaped cherry tomatoes
10 stems of asparagus
Salt to taste
2 tbsp oil

METHOD
-Place the water in a large vessel and bring to boil. Once it’s boiling, add the salt and pasta. Cook until al dente according to the directions on the carton. Then drain(Tip: keep about 1/3 cup of pasta water aside before draining) and pour cold water on the pasta to stop it from getting cooked any further.
-To make the pesto: In a blender/food processor, blend the fresh basil, walnuts, oil, salt and pepper until a coarse paste is achieved. Keep aside.
-Prepare the vegetables. Wash them all clean.
Cut off the bulbs from the ramp leaves. The bulbs can be chopped and used. (I used about 2-3 of them). Chop off the woody portion of the asparagus stems.
-Heat a large saucepan and add some oil. Once it is heated add the cleaned asparagus and sprinkle some salt. Stir fry until softened. Keep aside once cooked.
Do the same with the cherry tomatoes and keep aside.
-Heat a teaspoon of oil and add the chopped bulbs of the ramp, saute until they brown and then add the leaves, sprinkle some salt. Stir fry until they wilt an soften.
-To this, add the pesto, frozen peas and the drained pasta.Add the pasta water which had been kept aside if you feel the need to make a thinner sauce. Let the dish heat up for a few minutes.
-Serve hot with a the cherry tomatoes and asparagus on the side and perhaps a grating of parmesan.

Khara Biscuits & My Love-Hate Relationship with Sugar

Rosy as it may seem, my relationship with sugar like any other is flawed. Sweet yet oddly imperfect.
I hail from a family that is ravenous for sugar and the clan has rightly  realized that its absence will only add to the existing pandemonium. Hence, we give in to its captivity. Be it the amber hued jaggery syrup that is made specially for dosas to diligently mop up or those surreptitious, midnight thefts of of chocolate or those weekend dessert projects bustling in the kitchen, such as Holige( Sweet Rotis)  and the likes or that generous chunk of jaggery stirred into every single savory dish, we love “the sweet life” and life without it is imagined to be listless, dark and sullen. I finally have a reason for my foray into the cozy, hygge-ligt world of baking. It is that “sweet”gene rampant in my cells that yells and throws unbearable tantrums until I give in.

Continue reading “Khara Biscuits & My Love-Hate Relationship with Sugar”

The ‘Stop to Smell the Roses’ Cake

Not that a chocolate or an orange flavoured cake doesn’t entice me substantially, but that winter morning demanded a distraction from the familiar. I was fortunate Sumayya Usmani’s ‘Mountain Berries and Dessert Spices’ had sailed from it’s confines of the store and landed amid the cozy comforts of my living room. The author is driven by authenticity and her recipes are brimming with tradition. She paints the book with dishes showcasing the magic of rose petals, cardamom, berries, pistachios and other produce native to her homeland.

Continue reading “The ‘Stop to Smell the Roses’ Cake”

Lessons I’m Learning from my Mother….Sihi Kootu & More

“My mother is my best friend”….the old chestnut holds true with me as well…
Admittedly, I can go on for ages about how her children received immense priority ultimately leading up to her sacrificing her best career years in order to render us all a warm home. With a husband whose job entails touring the country half the month & three children, two of whom are really hooligans disguised as chubby little boys, the cacophony & chaos can prove challenging and not just in terms of time. I can write about how her face beams with a blend of pride and satisfaction when people notice me as her mirror image and how the same face cringes when some mistakenly mention otherwise! I can write about how she thoughtfully scribes the sweetest( and longest!) messages that prompt me to effortlessly tear up 10,000 miles away and how she indefatigably listens to me blather for hours about the most inane topics. I can write about how she instilled the love of God in our hearts at a tender age thereby guiding us to live a life saturated with faith. I can also write about how she perpetually corrects our lapses and how she relentlessly eludes us from the poisons of revenge.
However,  I won’t.
Today I want to share with you the lessons I am LEARNING from her….
To say she is the epitome of patience is practically an understatement and this can be vouched for by any soul that’s crossed paths with her. The worst of agitations don’t trigger her to bring the roof down. She is the icy water that douses fiery hot heads! As a teen, I learnt the rewards patience can bestow upon one….the learning continues…

Her calm demeanor culminates as her biggest strength. Recalling the pandemonium that joint families can be subjected to, it dawns on me that her serene silence and smile nonchalantly answered most circumstances. My learning continues….

Trying times bizarrely are directly proportional with her degrees of optimism. Needless to say, much needed. Hope is never a dearth at home and that’s saying something.
When life hands lemons, she musters up courage and emerges a winner. She protectively continues to stand up for us in our toughest times and is indubitably my pillar of strength. I continue to learn and if only I can soak in one drop in that ocean of optimism…..

Among the many feathers in a mother’s cap, she also transpires as a long distance constant cooking coach, guiding me gently and indulgently through the complications of it all, awaiting reviews from a hungry son in law. Although I picked up the the basics of Madhwa Cuisine under my mother in law’s unremitting tutelage, there are some recipes that I continue to learn from my mother….Sihi Kootu is one such. How can I possibly forget devouring bowl after bowl of Sihi Kootu with warm rice as I rushed back home from school? Or when I visited the same home with a husband by my side,  15 years later?

We now arrive at the kitchen of my mother’s home, wafting with  aromas of a simmering Sihi Kootu!

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The recipe has flawlessly been passed down the many generations: what my mom learnt from my great grandmother, I learn from my mom. While my great grandmother laboriously and painstakingly ground the spices and coconut in a mammoth stone mortar & pestle, we get away with a turn of a knob! “It doesn’t taste the same”, my mom says.
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Sihi means sweet in Kannada & Kootu basically belongs to the sambar/stew family which means it is rich in dal, coconut & vegetables. I feel the need to clarify that it’s not necessarily sweet but mainly called so to ensure that it’s not confused with another Kootu, the ‘Kharaddu’ meaning Spicy.
The addition of pepper & dry chillies impart a subtle heat to the dish. Byadgi (mildly spicy but adds colour) & Guntoor (very spicy but doesn’t add much colour) are the two types of dry chillies used and together they create a balanced combination. There’s jaggery, which is a mandatory in Madhwa cuisine that lends a sweet note to the dish that when mixed with ghee(clarified butter) and rice can easily become a feast for the Gods! Dal i.e. Toor Dal is added in a slightly generous quantity than regular sambars to give a thicker, creamier consistency. With a whole lot of Dal(lentils), Veggies, & a medley of spices, this authentic South Indian Vegan dish is a bowl of warmth & comfort.

The learning continues….

I hope you try this recipe and I would love me a feedback:) Also, I’m trying my hand at food photography and styling these days….I do hope you like these pictures!

RECIPE FOR SIHI KOOTU

INGREDIENTS
3/4th cup Toor Dal
Roughly 3 cups of chopped vegetables like Beans, Carrots, Chayote, Potatoes & legumes like pigeon peas & Padpi lilva
1.5 tbsp jaggery
10 curry leaves
Salt to taste
For the masala paste –
1.5 tbsp urad dal
3 Guntoor dry red chilles(very spicy)
5 Byadgi Dry Red chillies( a little less spicy)
3/4 tsp peppercorns
1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
For tempering –
1 tsp of oil
1 tsp of mustard seeds
1 tsp urad dal
A good pinch of Hing/AsafoetidaMETHOD
1. Pressure cook toor dal with 2.5-3 times the water
2. Cook the veggies in boiling water & a little bit of salt. Alternatively, it can be pressure cooked along with the dal itself but there is a chance they may become a little mushy.
3. In the meanwhile, make the masala paste.In a kadai, take a teaspoon of oil and fry Urad dal, chillies, peppercorn in medium heat until the dal is golden brown in colour. Allow them to cool.
4. Once it’s cooled, grind it with fresh grated coconut and some water to get a paste of medium coarse consistency.
5. Add this to the cooked dal & veggies along with jaggery,curry leaves & salt. Let it come to a boil.
6. To temper, in a smaller kadai/tadka pan, add oil and once it heats up,  add urad dal & mustard seeds. Let the mustard crackle and then add Hing.
7. Add this to the Kootu. Serve hot with rice & ghee

Matcha Raspberry Pancakes – Eggfree

Ever since the time my grandma visited the States & learnt the art of making pancakes, they have been adored and coveted for at home. Although stores in Bangalore didn’t carry Maple Syrup at the time, she cleverly substituted it with a warm homemade sugar syrup and slowly but surely we discovered the indulgences of a sweet breakfast. Few things rival sweet wafts of simmering sugar & sizzling skillets and they’re just the remedy to ward off sleep on lazy weekend mornings.

IMG_2180They make their presence fairly often at home too and the only change I indulge in is I substituting whole wheat flour with all purpose flour owing to it’s high fibre content.
The pancakes that I’m sharing with you today, are enriched by the addition of Matcha/green tea powder. Apart from imparting an earthy flavour, they rank high on the health-foods list since they’re known to be packed with antioxidants.Tons of tart raspberries go into these pancakes as well and if I’m being honest, a pancake without berries ( in any form) is somewhat bizarre to me. To score some extra health points, I even topped them up with some overnight soaked chia seeds. They’re soft, moist, warm & addictive to say the least.
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The recipe I’ve shared makes two pancakes but just double/triple the measurements to make more.
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It would be wrong to post a pancake recipe without a mention of good ol’ IHOP. When the husband & me were in the US, midnight hunger pangs were always satiated by the delicious pancakes at IHOP. With a myriad of flavours like blueberry, chocolate, white chocolate-raspberry & strawberry banana, all stacked to perfection & dripping with  golden sticky syrup, any day is Sunday! This is where my love for pancakes grew so intense, I had to put a stop on it what with all the calorie gain and everything.
( P S. Imagine my surprise when I realised they have franchises here in Canada too)

I do hope you like & try these delicious pancakes and make your Sundays a little more magical!
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RECIPE FOR EGGLESS MATCHA RASPBERRY PANCAKES (Makes 2 pancakes)
INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 tsp sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tbsp oil
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
1/2 cup milk
1/2 tbsp water
1 tbsp melted butter
100 gms fresh raspberries
1 tsp Matcha powder
METHOD

1. In a medium sized bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients: Whole wheat flour, sugar, baking powder and Matcha powder.
2. Add in the wet ingredients: Oil, vanilla essence, milk, water and mix very gently. If some lumps are there don’t worry about it but make sure to not overmix.
3. Let the batter rest for 5 minutes. Then add the melted butter.
4. Meanwhile, heat a non stick tava/skillet over the stove in medium heat. Spread some melted butter on top and spoon a big ladleful of batter on the tava. Top with lots of raspberries.
5. After 2-3 minutes, flip the pancake (ensuring it has achieved a nice golden brown) and cook again for a few minutes.
6. Top with more raspberries & powdered sugar.