Let there be Dal: Gujarati Dal with Green Pea and Coconut Dumplings

Rewinding to languid Bangalore afternoons, when I was younger in a younger city. The sun washing the sand splashed grounds of college. Amid the frenzied flutter that the final years of college demanded, the one constant was my stainless steel lunch dabba. Plain toor dal, rice, salt, jaggery  and unmeasured quantities of ghee tied together into an epitome of comfort. Tovve anna in Kannada or Dal rice in English. On rare occasions, it would be spiked with raw chilles, coriander and perhaps a splatter of mustard and hing tadka. Those few minutes of lunch break dwindled before I knew it, mostly plagued by a string of worrisome thoughts about the remaining day. But devouring this meal was my present moment, my moment of unfettered, happy calm. I’m as drawn to the simplicity of this dish as I am to the  uncomplicated memories that follow in its trail. Long story short, I love tovve-anna and have never shied away from celebrating Dal and its many avatars.


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Understandably, tovve-anna makes its divine presence fairly often. Aside from that. simple dals emboldened with cucumber or ridgegourd or capsicums are consisitent too. A North- Indian version with spices, onions and tomatoes and a seducing tadka is more a fortnighly scene. Dal Makhni with its protein rich lentils and oodles of butter is a rare visitor. My kitchen has also witnessed a Rajasthani Panchmel Dal albeit only in one instance. Another dish that has made a debut is Gujarati Dal Dhokli that I learnt from a talented friend on Instagram; she describes it as a warm hug in a bowl and I can vouch for that without doubt. What I’m about to share with you today is conjured on similar lines as the Dal Dhokli . I ventured on to broaden my horizon just a little bit more. Perhaps indulge in something a little more audacious!
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 Anjum Anand’s wonderful creation,  ‘Indian Vegetarian Feast’ was just the the book that needed a break from its long hiatus in our bookshelf. Her book is brimming with curries and warm dishes that winter nights demand so fiercely. This beauty of a dal is no different. It is subtly sweet owing to jaggery  and awfully comforting. The dumplings are made with wholewheat and stuffed with peas and coconut, almost a melt-in-the-mouth experience when dunked in dal.
Poured over rice or daliya this dish can be thoroughly satisfying but it easily transforms into a hearty winter soup. Ladle into a big bowl and devour as is. 
Only a few changes in my version: fresh coconut replaced dry coconut and roasted peanuts were added without restraint. Also, the original recipe has included the addition of kokum, a fruit that lends a sour flavour but since I didn’t have any I’ve relied on my good friend, the tamarind.
Hope you like this dish as much as we did:)
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RECIPE FOR GUJARATI DAL WITH GREEN PEA AND COCONUT DUMPLINGS
INGREDIENTS
For the Dal:
1 cup split pigeon peas or Toor Dal, washed
1/2 tsp turmeric
1 large tomato, chopped
2 tbsp jaggery
3/4 inch of ginger, peeled and grated
a pinch of chilli powder(add more if you want the dish to have more heat)
2 tbsp roasted peanuts(or more), crushed coarsely
2 tbsp ghee
1/4 tsp asafoetida
4 cloves
2 tbsp ghee
8 dried kokum, soaked(optional)
1/2 ts p each of mustard and cumin seeds
1/4 tsp fenugreek seeds
1 tsp ground coriander
10 curry leaves
1 tsp readymade tamarind paste or soak a tsp of tamarind in hot water and squeeze out the thick juice
Salt to taste

For the Dough
1/2 cup wholewheat or chapati flour
1/4 tsp turmeric
1/4 tsp ajwain or carom seeds
1 tbsp vegetable oil

For the Filling
1 cup frozen peas
1 tsp ghee
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
2 tbsp fresh or dry coconut( I used fresh)
an inch of ginger- peeled and grated

METHOD
-First, the split pigeon peas or toor dal needs to be cooked soft. They can either be pressure cooked or boiled in a large vessel. Either way, add two times the water along with turmeric and a few drops of oil. Cook until completely mushy. Then, using a stick blender, puree until smooth.
(If using a vessel to cook it, cover it partially and keep an eye. Sometimes the water water may spill over)
-Next, make the dough by mixing together all the ingredients listed. Knead until soft and elastic. Keep aside by covering with a wet cloth.
-Thirdly, the filling is prepared. Boil the frozen peas in salted water until completely soft. Drain the water and mash either with a wooden spoon or cool completely and blend in a mixer. To the mashed peas, add grated ginger and fresh grated coconut. Then, in a little pan(tadka pan), heat ghee and add mustard seeds. Once they splutter, add it to the peas mixture and keep aside.
-To the pureed dal/lentils, add the chopped tomato, jaggery, peanuts, chilli powder, salt and tamarind and simmer for 10 minutes in low heat.
-Meanwhile, prepare the dumplings. Divide the dough into 9 or 10 portions. Take one, roll into a little ball and then roll into a thin 3 inch circle all the while. Use some extra wholewheat flour to keep it from sticking to the countertop or rolling pin.
Take 1 tablespoon of the filling, place on one half of the circle. Using your finger line the entire edge of the circle with a little water and fold one half over the other, tightly pressing on the seams and making sure the filling is well within the dumpling.
Make all the dumplings this way and keep aside.
-Add about 1 cup or 1.5 cups of water to the dal and thin it down. The amount of water may vary depending on how thick you like your dal. To this, add the dumplings and let them cook for about 5-7minutes or until done. Important to note that the dumplings should be added to the dal just before serving or else they may disintegrate and turn mushy.
Finally, add the tadka or tempering. In the same tadka pan used above, heat more ghee and add to it cloves and cinnamon. Also add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, fenugreek seeds and asafoetida. Add curry leaves that have been washed and dried well with a cloth or tissue. Once the mustard seeds splatter and the curry leaves have crisped up, add the tempering to the dal and serve hot.

40 thoughts on “Let there be Dal: Gujarati Dal with Green Pea and Coconut Dumplings

  1. I have never tasted dal in this form! This is a really unique spin on the usual toor dal that is cooked in most north Indian households! Everything from the addition of jaggery and tamarind, to those pea and coconut dumplings sounds so cozy and yummy! This is one of those meals that can lift you with comfort on one of those bad days! Or fill you with more pleasure on a good day! Thanks for sharing Divya!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was like a breath of fresh air for me too Deepika! I loved it so much , that’s why I thought I have to share it:) I’m so so happy that you liked it , and I couldn’t have said it better… definitely a mood lifter:) Thank you for the love sweetheart❤️

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  2. You have rendered the humble ‘dal rice’, a royal status with your post, Divya. But can I ever not agree on that. Yes I loved the simplicity of dal rice too during my college days and even now. The simple mix of boiled dal with a dash of salt and some ghee and rice was the perfect gateaway from all our worrisome days. Gujarati dal is a big hit here with my children and the other adult in our home so this sure should resonate a similar response too. And to grace these cold winter evenings with this delicacy will sure be a treat. Thank you, Divya for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for these kind words Pranitha, always a joy to read your comments. Means a lot! So true, The simple version of dal never fails to exert its magic:) I’m so thrilled that you liked the recipe and like you said, definitely a warm therapy for winter:)

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh, this looks heavenly delicious, Divya! Comfort food and what’s even better healthy comfort food at that! The dumplings remind me a bit of Italian ravioli. Thank you for sharing this special recipe with us! Hugs! 😄 xoxo 💕

    Liked by 1 person

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